FBI Retrieved 11 sets Of Classified Material After Raiding Trump's Mar-a-Lago Home Over Espionage Act Violation Investigation

FBI Retrieved 11 sets Of Classified Material After Raiding Trump’s Mar-a-Lago Home Over Espionage Act Violation Investigation

A property receipt from Trump’s recent Mar-a-Lago home raid reveals some of the materials recovered by the FBI were marked as “top secret/SCI” — one of the highest levels of classification.

The search warrant identifies three federal crimes that the Justice Department is investigating: violations of the Espionage Act, obstruction of justice, and criminal handling of government records. The inclusion of the crimes proves the Justice Department has probable cause to look into those offenses as it was gathering evidence in the raid. As of now, no one has been charged with a crime, CNN reported.

The warrant receipt didn’t provide information on the subject of these classified documents however it did note that federal agents seized just one set that was labeled “top secret/SCI.”

Federal agents also took retrieved sets of “top secret” documents, three sets of “secret” documents, and three sets of “confidential” documents, court documents stated. In total, the unsealed warrant reveals the agency collected over 20 boxes, as well as binders of photos, sets of classified government materials, and at least one handwritten note.

The warrant, which was released publicly following a federal judge’s order, was obtained by the outlet ahead of its release. The event marks an unprecedented week that all started with the search, which is now an evidence-gathering step in a national security investigation.

As details about the documents remain scarce, the laws mentioned in the warrant provide new insight into what the FBI was looking for when it raided Trump’s home, which is an unprecedented step that has resulted in a firestorm of criticism from the former President’s closest friends.

The laws cover “destroying or concealing documents to obstruct government investigations” as well as the unlawful removal of government records, the search warrant states.

Also among the laws added is one known as the Espionage Act, which is in regards to the “retrieval, storage, or transmission of national defense information or classified material.”

All three criminal laws cited in the warrant are from Title 18 of the United States Code and none of them are solely based on whether the information was deemed to be unclassified.

About Crystal Gross

Crystal joined BallerAlert in 2020 to renew her passion for writing. She is a Kentucky native who now lives in the heart of Atlanta. She enjoys reading, politics, traveling, and of course writing.

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